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NoSquint

General Tab

To NoSquint, a site is a web location where all pages have the same zoom level and color settings, and the site name is derived from the page's URL.

In most cases, the site is the domain. For example, if the current page is www2.ibm.com/index.php, NoSquint will consider the site name to be ibm.com. NoSquint will also take into account common country-specific second-level domains. For example, if you're visiting www.bbc.co.uk, NoSquint will consider the site name to be bbc.co.uk.

The default behaviour should work almost all the time. When it doesn't, you can control how NoSquint determines site names in the Exceptions Tab.

Per-site settings (color and zoom)

Zooming Tab

The options in this tab let you control the default zooming behavior as they apply to all sites. You can override the zoom levels for individual sites using the Site Settings, which can be managed by left-clicking on NoSquint's status bar icon, or selecting NoSquint Site Settings from the page's context menu.

Default Zoom Options

Colors Tab

Sometimes website creators choose to use rather questionable color choices which can significantly hinder readability. NoSquint lets you override the standard text colors for all sites here. Or (probably more usefully), you can modify per-site colors via the Site Settings, which can be managed by left-clicking on NoSquint's status bar icon, or selecting NoSquint Site Settings from the page's context menu.

Text and Background

Link Colors

Exceptions Tab

Because not all web sites are structured the same, sometimes the default logic NoSquint uses to determine the site name doesn't work the way you want it to. Using exceptions, you can control how NoSquint determines what constitutes a separate site.

Use Cases

Exceptions are powerful and expressive, and unfortunately can be confusing. They are specified using a simple custom grammar, not regular expressions. Before going into a detailed explanation, let's first examine some common use-cases. Hopefully one of these examples applies to your case.

  1. Problem: different subdomains on SourceForge, e.g. freevo.sourceforge.net and audacity.sourceforge.net, are wrongly treated as the same site (sourceforge.net)
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern *.sourceforge.net
  2. Problem: example.com/users/mary and example.com/users/john are wrongly treated as the same site (example.com)
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern example.com/users/*
  3. Problem: I use Google Mail (mail.google.com) and Google Reader (google.com/reader) and would like these treated as sites separate from google.com
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern mail.google.com; add another exception with the pattern google.com/reader
  4. Problem: my company's intranet is at intra.example.com, but I'd like our wiki, located under intra.example.com/wiki to be treated separately from the rest of the intranet.
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern intra.example.com/wiki
  5. Problem: Google Mail, Google Groups, and in fact all hosts on Google should be treated as separate sites. But the country (the top-level domain) shouldn't matter. So mail.google.ca should be the same site as mail.google.de, but a different site from groups.google.de, which itself would be the same site as groups.google.fi
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern *.google.[*]
  6. Problem: my company has several web applications that are distributed across multiple servers. example.com/server1/apps/app1 should be considered the same site as example.com/server2/apps/app1, but there could also be example.com/server1/apps/app3 that should be a separate site.
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern example.com/[*]/apps/*
  7. Problem: same scenario as the previous one, but sometimes the server isn't in the URL, so example.com/apps/app1 is the same site as example.com/server1/apps/app1.
    Solution: add an exception with the pattern example.com/[**]apps/*

Gory Details

What follows is a technical explanation of exceptions. If you're not an advanced user, this section may create a fair amount of confusion; refer instead to the use-cases above to follow by example.

Exception patterns may contain zero or more of the following possible wildcards:

Site names are arbitrary strings that represent a given site and are computed by NoSquint based on the current page's URL and the user-defined list of exceptions. For instance, both foo.example.com and myapp.*.example.com could be site names, depending on the exceptions defined. NoSquint looks up zoom levels based on the site name. The site name, as determined by NoSquint, can be viewed in the tooltip by hovering over the magnifying glass in the status bar, or by opening the Site Settings dialog by left clicking the magnifying glass in the status bar.

When a wildcard is enclosed in square brackets (i.e. [*] or [**]), the literal wildcard (* or **) will be used in the site name instead of the characters the wildcard matches. This is allows you to group together locations. For example, if the page's URL is google.ca and you've defined an exception google.[*], the site name will be google.*. Since google.fi matches this pattern, the site name would also be google.*. Therefore, google.ca and google.fi would be considered the same site.

Hostnames and paths are evaluated separately; an exception pattern is split into two sub-patterns, one for the host, and one for the path. These sub-patterns match substrings, but hosts are right-anchored, while paths are left-anchored. This means that any wildcards specified in the host name will not match any characters in the path, and vice versa. When the hostname part of a pattern is only *, it matches the domain of the page's URL. For example, for www.google.com, a single * matches google.com; for www.bbc.co.uk it matches bbc.co.uk.

Hostname parts can optionally contain a port number, which is delimited from the hostname with a : (colon). For example, *:8080 will cause port 8080 for all domains to be treated separately, so that www.example.com is considered a different site than www.example.com:8080 (but, assuming no other exceptions than this, www.example.com:8001 is still considered the same site as www.example.com or www.example.com:4242).

Any exception whose host part is the null string – in other words, the exception begins with a / (front slash) – is applied only to file:// URLs. So the exception /home/* for Linux or /C:/Users/* for Windows Vista causes all home directories to be treated distinctly from one another.

When multiple exception patterns match a page's URL, NoSquint will use the exception that matches the most non-wildcard characters in the host name. If there are still multiple exceptions in that narrowed list, the exception that matches the most non-wildcard characters in the path is then chosen. If still there are multiple exceptions, the first one that matched is chosen.

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